From the Sixties to the End of the Noughties..did it match up to expectations?


Hello Good People who read this blog

I am listening to music over the headphones while I write this, to keep me focussed and calm,so I might as well start by sharing what I am listening to. Some English sixties folk, Sandy Denny with an acoustic home recorded demo version of Who Knows Where the Time Goes?

Across the purple sky, all the birds are leaving…

Well everyone on TV and radio seems to be reviewing the noughties. I can’t believe a decade has gone by.

I feel a sense of foreboding in broaching the subject of the “noughties” as I think for me it was a decade that started with high hopes and ends in doubt, fear and disappointment. In my personal life that is not the case but in terms of an alternative type of person living in London, it has not been a great decade.

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I guess for me this decade started in the sixties. As a child, the year 2000 seemed like an impossibly long time away. I wondered if I actually would live to be that old.

In 1968 , this is what we thought could be happening in 2001:

At school in the sixties,one of the favourite essay topics of teachers, was to ask us write about how the world would be in the year 2000. We all wrote about world peace, wearing silver suits, having robots to do all our housework, going for holidays in outer space, an absence of disease, poverty and famine and extraordinary futuristic and sophisticated pop music,together with the occasional time machine and transporter room ( in the style of Star Trek). It is hardly surprising that we were so optimistic, the sixties was an amazing time of progress, with the peace movement, breaking down of many prejudices,new fashions made of new synthetic materials, amazing ground-breaking pop music, advances in medicine and the proliferation of science fiction which speculated on how new technology would affect us all in the future.

Some of the predictions made by scientists were very misguided.

Tomorrow’s World (BBC)  in the late 60s

At other times the predictions were petty spot on. Here is a clip I found called Britain of the Future . It features mobile phones, CCTV in banks, luxury short plane journeys to Sydney, computers and the internet, how we will select our children for mathematical ability, flatscreen TVs  and more.If you play it 5 minutes in, you will find some predictions for 2000. The population figures quoted must be for Britain only. In fact according to the National Statistics office the UK population in 2008 was 61 million and not quite the 65 million that they anticipated for 2000.

It is hardly surprising that in the sixties, a time of great creativity, invention and hope, that we looked to the future with great excitement. Could we say the same now? How do we see the future in these fearful times where every TV programme seems to warn us about some threat : climate change,  terrorist attack, or timeless pleasures that are a danger to our health, as well as the possibility of financial ruin or new diseases that will wipe us all out unless we wash our hands 20 times a day.

Do you know any teachers who ask their class to write an essay about how exciting life will be in the year 2050?

Poor kids today!

In 1969, western consciousness was full of hope. Everyone with access to a TV,remembers the day when Apollo 11 landed on the moon.  The music of The Beatles, Hendrix and others was so new, young and exciting , we hoped that with new technology  we would be creating the most amazing music ever by 2010…OOPS! We didn’t account for those forces that kill creativity: trying to make money by trying to appeal to all, trying to look perfect, marketing, advertising, selling your soul to Satan Cowell etc..

I remember sitting with some friends back in the eighties, after listening to all four “sides” of  Electric Ladyland and saying:  “Just imagine what music Hendrix would make if he’d survived until the year 2000 , with all that technology!” and others agreeing and imagining this amazing music with  new synthesizers and effects and even computers.

Now I think:”Yep…if Hendrix had survived, I bet his record company would be re-issuing all his old stuff. Maybe having gone through a brief “Unplugged” tour during the nineties.” Cynical me…

But technology has brought some interesting new music, even if it is sometimes rehashed old music from the sixties. Recently this was recommended to me by two people in their twenties. DJ Shadow’s “Endtroducing” ,first released in 1996 and re-issued in 2005.This album is created entirely out of samples. D.J Shadow combines these skillfully to make a totally new, and some would say,genius, classic album.

Is this the future of music?

Building Steam with a Grain of Salt  by  DJ Shadow.

I like it, but I prefer Dark Side of The Moon which uses samples of speech but where  the music is less repetitive and  the lyrics have a message.( Or do I have a case of middle-aged “They just don’t write tunes like they used to and don’t police officers look young”etc.?)P.S. 3/1/2010 However this track has definitely “grown on me” in the past few days. I find a lot of good music plays that trick.

Another PS!!!!

I recently interviewed Andy Leung for another  little radio documentary, he is the keyboard player from the band “Introducing” a nine piece band who play “Endtroducing” live at gigs and festivals. Now  this has become one of my fav tracks , here they are playing “Building Steam with a Grain of Salt” and other tracks for the album at the Skylarkin, Carling Academy Oxford in December 2008. What do you think?

I hope that the future of music in 2010 and beyond goes back to live performance, more thought-provoking contents, and originality. Unlike in previous decades, the music business is no longer the only way for independent minded musicians to get their music aired. The internet has liberated us and trapped us at the same time.

As far as file sharing goes, my feelings are mixed. The musicians I know,mostly don’t mind file sharing, they also like using open source materials and all the free things on the internet to help them, from myspace, to music lessons on youtube. But the musicians I know don’t make a whole lot of money. Internet file sharing is nothing new, ever heard of cassette recorders and photocopying machines? As a child/teenager I had very little pocket money. We used to record the entire chart show on Radio One on an old reel to reel recorder. I still have the tapes!

Here is Kraftwerk being futuristic in 1978.Will music in the coming decade be progressive or retrogressive? It all depends on what our collective consciousness or fashion dictate.

The Robots ( nevermind playing synthesizers, will they design robots to do the bloody housework next decade?)

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Like the Apollo 11 Moon Landing, there have been some moments in life, commonly shared with others, where I remember where I was and who I was with, and every feeling and thought impressed  up there in my memory.Preceeding the beginning of the nougthies, there was the eclipse which I saw on Hampstead Heath in London, together with several hundred others.Each one of us forwarned eternally by the media not to look straight up at the sun. It was a special and spiritual moment, I spoke to many Londoners who I didn’t know there, and strangely I bumped into all sorts of music people I knew,but who were equally surprised to see me there. The eclipse reminded us that day, that we were only on a small, rather vulnerable planet, I felt united with others, but for some reason it made me feel sad too.

New Year’s Eve 2000 itself was also a strange time for me personally,  I remember having ventured alone into Central London around the Thames surrounded by thousands of others.I have never felt so lonely! London can be like that. Luckily I went to a friend’s place later.

I guess the main events from the Noughties that affected everything else in our daily lives in London, was September the 11th 2001 followed by the invasion of Iraq in 2003. Both events completely changed the London I knew into a place where CCTV and police apparently took over. I also remember the bus and tube bombings of July 2005 and the further aborted bombings a couple of weeks later. My entire neighbourhood was cordoned off that day, and a friend had to stay at my place because the police wouldn’t let him go home.

Immediately after September the 11th , I was very interested to hear all the “ins and outs” of why the “plane crashes”  could have  happened.

I knew both Americans and Lebanese people at that time, who knew a lot about politics. Before the full story broke out in the news, it was pretty obvious from my conversations with them, that it was bound to be a group from the middle-east over Palestine.

The protest march against the invasion of Iraq in February 2003 was another day I will never forget. I have been on a quite a few protest marches, but this was exceptional. The political apathy of the British public was dispelled for once and to take part in the march was amazing. It was freezing cold and slow, but I was so pleased to see others of all ages and backgrounds united in not wanting a war.

I had written a detailed letter to my MP at the time, Michael Portilo, a month or two beforehand, giving him five well-thought out reasons why we should not invade Iraq. One of my main points was that London would become a target for terrorists if we got involved in America’s attack. I stated that we were still regarded as neutral until we committed to invading Iraq. I wrote that I thought that central London would become a less friendly, and more dangerous place with armed police, and that there would be a threat of terrorist attacks on the tubes.

To my surprise, and to his credit, Portilo wrote back me ( or maybe someone in his office wrote it for him) . It was a long letter, replying to each one of my five points in detail. The letter is somewhere up in my attic I think, I could not find it to quote here unfortunately ( I may add it later).

Portilo assured me that if we did not invade Iraq, that London would become a terrorist target and a dangerous place to live. Although a conservative MP, he  fully supported the labour government’s actions. I might have sounded hysterical in my letter,but I was right.  Our tubes were bombed and London did become a far more paranoid and fearful place, with new detention laws and the police, at times taking over tube stations with an aggressive and intimidating presence,compounded by stories of police torture at Scotland Yard, police brutality at recent climate change protests etc…

I have subsequently met Kurdish refugees from Iraq and Turkey, living here in London, who were extremely happy to see Saddam go. One guy I knew lost not only his family, but all his friends,school teachers and everyone he ever met in his entire life, through one of Saddam’s mass gas attacks of the Kurds.

I am still a pacifist and think we were wrong to invade Iraq, but these things are never entirely black and white.

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I guess my main worry for the next decade is the impact of climate change, I do think life for people will have to change whether we plan for it or not.

On a positive note, I am a great believer in Mother Earth. Before all the patriarchal religions ( and yes I know I will upset many by writing this!) there were religions in most parts of the world based on the concept of the great mother, the giver of life. The planet and all living things , and sometimes non-living things such land,rocks and hills etc. were sacred and respected.

If we don’t adopt a better attitude, then the forces of nature which are stronger than the forces of man, will take over.I believe the planet will be self-regulating. This is a very harsh image and of course I don’t want anyone to die or suffer. If we think of the planet as a kind of living being under threat (from billions of  little human parasites), then I believe that it could rebel and kill enough people so that it can restore itself back to health.

Well let’s see if we can prevent any great tragedy from happening by using  less, and thinking more about the way we treat our planet within this gigantic, wonderful and mysterious Universe. We must choose to either plunder or to care for this beautiful, delicate, live-giving planet Earth.

Happy New Year 2010,

May the next decade bring us Wisdom and Peace

Born2rant

Open Mic Songwriting Communities


Hello Good People who read this blog….

Here’s me sounding terribly posh with an Ethnomusicology documentary on how acoustic/folk clubs support and help develop new songs and performance. Sometimes, like other academic research, I might be stating the bloody obvious, or putting long words to simple ideas, but I hope you enjoy it anyway.

Part one

Part two

Part three

Now I have to concentrate on my own music for a bit along with studies and personal life.

So wishing you Love and Peace

Born2rant

Track Listings:

Please note: I recorded over forty different songwriters over two days. Most of them did not introduce their songs on stage and I neglected to ask each one for their song titles , if indeed they had named their songs yet. I have therefore omitted many of the song titles.

All tracks are recorded by myself on a hand-held Olympus Digital Voice recorder (DS-40)

except for track 14) recorded in 1995 by Simon Scardinelli.

Most of the tracks were recorded at The Green Note, 106 Parkway, in Camden ,on Sunday 29th of March 2009 between 1 and 5 pm. The clips from the Virtually Acoustic Open Mic, were recorded at The Perseverance, 11 Shrotton Street, in Marylebone on Monday 30th of March 2009 between 7.30 pm and 11 pm.

1)Benjamin Thomas recorded at the Green Note Open Mic on 29/3/2009 -59 sec..

2)Interview : Dave Russell recorded 18/3/2009 in my home-56 sec..

3)John Peacock playing his song “Iodine”

Recorded at The Perseverance 30/3/2009 at the Virtually Acoustic Open Mic – 1 min. 2 sec..

4)Siobhan Watts introducing Open Mic rules.

Recorded at The Green Note Open Mic 29/3/2009.- 18 sec..

5)David Sherwood introducing his Open Mic

Recorded at The Perseverance 30/3/2009-23 sec..

6) Tom Poslett playing at the Virtually Acoustic Club recorded 30/3/2009-57 sec..

7)Interview: Alan Levy at the Green Note 29/3/2009- 52 seconds..

8)Alan Levy’s song about fridge and dancing on the table. Recorded at The Green Note Open Mic 29/3/2009-32 sec..

9)Interview :“George The Troubadour”

Recorded at The Perseverance 30/3/2009- 1 min. 9 sec..

10) Oka Vanga playing at The Green Note 29/3/2009-47 sec..

11)Alan’s Easter Song recorded at The Virtually Acoustic Club 30/3/2009-25 sec..

12) Clip of general social noise at The Green Note 29/3/2009- 14 sec..

13) Daniel O’Byrne at the Virtually Acoustic Club 30/3/2009- 52 sec..

14) John Gash playing “It’s Easy to be Terrified”recorded at Bunjies in 8/4/1995-

1 minute 9 seconds.

Recorded by Simon Scardinelli at Bunjies Coffee House and Folk Cellar 27 Litchfield street, London WC2 .

15) Tom Nancollas playing “Lady Jane” written by his friend Jan Yates.

Recorded at the Green Note 29/3/09-1 min. 3 sec..

16) Interview :Alan Levy on stage nerves.

Recorded at the Green Note 29/3/2009-21 seconds

17) Interview: Siobhan Watts on quiet and stage nerves.

Recorded at The Green Note 29/3/2009-23 sec..

18) Interview: David Sherwood talking about not playing his songs at his clubs.

Recorded at The Perseverance 30/3/2009-59 sec..

19) Gerry Scales stage talk and song at The Green Note 29/3/2009-56 sec..

20) Clip of Siobhan’s Stage talk: “Ham’s Travel” recorded at The Green Note 29/3/2009-

28 sec..

21) Mike Rosenberg playing “Carved in Stone” recorded at The Perseverance 30/3/2009- 1 min.

Bibliography

Bealle, John ( 1993) “Self-Involvement in Musical Performance: Stage Talk and Interpretive Control at a Bluegrass Festival” Ethnomusicology 37.1:63-86.

Cadle, Peter (1994) Nights in the cellar: A History by Peter Cadle with contributions from performers and audiences over the past 40 years. London:Bunjies pp.6-15

Hesselink, Nathan (1994), “Kouta and karaoke in modern Japan: a blurring of the distinction between Umgangsmusik and Darbietungmusik”,British Journal of Ethnomusicology 3:49-61.

Jang, Yeonok (2001) “P’ansori performance style: audience responses and singers’ perspectives.” British Journal of Ethnomusicology. 10.2:99-121

Kisliuk, Michelle (1988) “’A Special Kind of Courtesy’:Action at a Bluegrass Festival Jam Session”.TDR 32.3:141-155

Seeger, Charles (1977) Studies in Musicology 1935-1975. Berkeley and Los Angeles:University of California Press.

Stockman, Doris (1978) “Zum Problem einer Klassification der kommunikativen Prozesse.” in Philosophische und ethische Probleme der modernen Verhaltensforschung, edited by G.Tembrock et. al., Berlin:Akademie-Verlag. quoted in Hesselink, Nathan (1994), “Kouta and karaoke in modern Japan: a blurring of the distinction between Umgangsmusik and Darbietungmusik”,British Journal of Ethnomusicology 3:49.

– ( 1991) “Interdisciplinary Approaches to Musical Communication Structures.” in Nettl and Bohlman (eds) Comparative Musicology and Anthropology of Music,318-341. Chicago and London:University of Chicago Press.

Film References

Message to Love : The Isle of Wight Festival (1997) BBC documentary Directed and written by Murray Lerner.127 minutes.

Woman of Heart and Mind (2003) Directed by Susan Lacy. PBS Documentary.120 minutes.

The Dave Russell Interviews reborn ( Notting Hill Arts- 1967-72)


Hello Good People who read this blog

If you go back in time to my earlier entries you will find some interesting stories about Notting Hill in the 60s and 70s and also Anti-Media activities in the 80s , bits about the gigs before Club Dog etc….

However I have been having problems with technology and the Dave Russell interviews being repeatedly deleted .

Therefore I have re-issued part one of this interview on Youtube. It’s the first time I have ever done anything like this so don’t expect miracles!

Enjoy ! and to read onthe background to the things mentioned in this interview go back to my previous post called

Notting Hill and the Arts 1967-1972: an interview with Dave Russell – Pink Floyd, Hawkwind, Gong and more…(Episode One)

This was written back in the winter of 2007 and the weather today is about the same.

here is part two of the interview for more information go to my previous post

(Episode two) Notting Hill and the Arts 1967-1972: an interview with Dave Russell -Psychedelic rock bands, Pink Floyd, Hawkwind, Ralph McTell, Davy Graham, lightshows, poets, and drug-taking in a crypt

Part two

Part Three

of the interview below please see this post for more details:

(Episode Three) Notting Hill and the Arts 1967-1972: an interview with Dave Russell – Jazz, Psychedelic Rock Bands, Poetry, Frestonia, Release and Pete Brown’s Battered Ornaments

The final part

read more on

(Episode Four) Dave Russell – Notting Hill 1967-1972 The Free School, Destruction in Art Symposium, Friends/Frendz magazine and the Rural Retreat

Love and peace

Born2rant

(Episode Four) Dave Russell – Notting Hill 1967-1972 The Free School, Destruction in Art Symposium, Friends/Frendz magazine and the Rural Retreat


(Episode Four) Notting Hill 1967-1972: an interview with Dave Russell – More about the Crypt ( arts and community centre), The Free School, Destruction in Art Symposium, Friends/Frendz magazine and the Rural Retreat

*I mention “Friends magazine” but it seems that they also spelt it “Frendz magazine”. For more info on the magazine including examples of articles go to this link: http://www.ibiblio.org/mal/MO/philm/friends/

Hello good people who read this blog. After an interlude of some time finally here we are …

Here is the final part of the Dave Russell interview about the Arts and Community Centre ( the Crypt) and beyond:

The Free School
In his interview I asked Dave about the Free School which is often associated with Pink Floyd ( who played at the Crypt too) . He said it had moved about a bit and referred me to another site. So I “borrowed” this map on Tom Vague’s site ( see links to “History Talk”). Dave said that he had done lots of archiving of materials and had helped Tom with the map so I am hoping it is ok to borrow it for my site. You will see on this map the location of the Free School changes as well as some of the other important sites ( and there were more not included on this map) double-click on the image to enlarge.

mapofportobello.jpg

from http://www.portobellofilmfestival.com/talkpics/talk-vague02.html

Destruction in Art
Dave mentions the destruction in Art Symposium who encouraged the smashing up of things. Here is another reference to it from Wikipedia complete with 1966 poster.

“The Destruction in Art Symposium (DIAS) was a gathering of a diverse group of international artists, poets, and scientists to London, from 9th11th September, 1966. Included in this number were representatives of the counter-cultural underground who were there to speak on the theme of destruction in art.”dias_poster.jpg

The Honorary Committee, led by Gustav Metzger, attracted the attention of both the international media and international art community to the symposium.

Michael Moorcock, Friends magazine, and Hawkwind

I asked Dave about these in the interview .Here is a second clip of the fantastic BBC4 Hawkwind documentary which was one of my main inspirations for writing this entire blog.It reminded me of a time long gone of artistic and creative revolution in London. The clip starts with sci-fi writer Michael Moorcock talking about happenings in Notting Hill ( or Ladbroke Grove) and documents further alternative strands in the area , plus Hawkwind and drugs.

Hawkwind Documentary

Flyers and Iain Jacobs

Iain Jacobs now an established photgrapher in Spain has contributed greatly to my research. He was one of the organisers of the Arts and Community Centre. He was 19 when he first joined their ranks. He also performed in The People Band and designed some of the flyers for the centre which migrated to various venues but was mostly at The Crypt , Lancaster Road.

He has very kindly sent me a quantity of flyers to help document this in my blog. I would very much have liked to have interviewed Carlyle Reedy , orginally from the U.S. ,who was the founder and main organiser of the Arts and Community Centre Notting Hill .At present she is not available but I am sure in time I will meet her and hopefully she can help me to document more.

Thanks again to Iain Jacobs for supplying me with the following documents:(click on them to enlarge)

accnh_brochure_cover.jpg

This is the brochure cover to the A.C.C.N.H.

accnh_brochure_inside.jpg Inside of Brochure

accnh_poster_01.jpg

The Continuous Music Ensemble poster

crypt_poster_01cardewamm.jpg

Cornelius Cardew Poster

crypt_poster_05third-ear-band-etc.jpg

The Third Ear Band

Some General Posters for the Arts and Community Centre Notting Hill:

crypt_poster_02general.jpgcrypt_poster_06.jpg

Poster for the Exploding Galaxy

crypt_poster_08cartoon.jpg

more info on The Exploding Galaxy
I found this on the “disinformation” website in relation to Genesis P-Orridge:
This would be around 1969

“After a near-death experience left him determined to follow his notion of becoming a beatnik writer, the young P-Orridge’s instinct for finding other “genetic terrorists” like himself led him to the psycho-therapeutic bootcamp of the Exploding Galaxy/Transmedia commune (which also included filmmaker Derek Jarman). Members were required to sleep in a different location every night, to take meals at different times during the day, and to act out assigned roles and attitudes, often in costume and with unerring earnestness, going so far as to have atypical sexual encounters (in character!) or risk getting badly beaten up if a situation warranted it.

The commune’s anarchistic spirit and insistence on life as art and art as life inspired the performance art events of COUM (pronounced “coom”) Transmissions. Staged primarily by P-Orridge and part time pin-up model Cosey Fanni Tutti (born Christine Carol Newby, 1951), COUM’s outrageous “happenings” were parallel to the work of Viennese Actionist Otto Muehl and Hermann Nitsch’s Orgies Mysteries Theater. COUM’s shamanic improvisations involving enemas, blood, roses, wire, feathers, sexual intercourse, milk, urine, licking up vomit, crucifixion, maggots and self-mutilation were often not conceptualized until the very moment of the performances, if at all. “Quoted from http://www.disinfo.com/archive/pages/article/id1246/pg1/index.html

It all sounds like an average Saturday night out to me! ( my attempt at humour) I don’t think anything quite that extreme went on at the Crypt in Notting Hill!

The Poetry Workshop

crypt_poster_04poetry-workshop.jpg

Jazz gigs at The Ladbroke Hotel

lh_poster_01.jpg lh_poster_00sounds.jpg

The People Band ( was in previous entry but I like this poster a lot!)

crypt_poster_07.jpg

Well that’s all for now….I hope to bring you more of something soon!

Have a good weekend and be creative without dollar/euro/pound signs in your cartoon eyes .

DAVE RUSSELL ( the man I interviewed and Notting Hill resident since the sixties)

Before I go one last vid. This is Dave Russell with ” Hades W10″ also known as “Nobody gets off at this bus stop” (The people in the background are quite interesting and entertaining …he usually gets a much better response than this!) after that he plays another one of his own songs “Crackdown Tribunal”. Dave is an intellectual creative rebel well-versed in folk, blues, jazz, punk and poetry. He has recorded countless albums of his songs as well as covering the rawest blues songs and setting music to William Blake and other  poetry. He has covered some Madonna songs which are so riotous that you’d think they were written by Dylan, Robert Johnson or John Lydon.

He revels in  words as well as music and has written two novels and a book of poetry. He plays all the acoustic clubs in London that are any good and avoids the soul-less ones looking for pretty pop stars.

At present he has no website or myspace although I hope one day this will happen.

(p.s. he is also a really nice bloke and my friend who has been very tolerant of me over the years)

see also

Notting Hill and the Arts 1967-1972: an interview with Dave Russell – Pink Floyd, Hawkwind, Gong and more…(Episode One)

(Episode two) Notting Hill and the Arts 1967-1972: an interview with Dave Russell -Psychedelic rock bands, Pink Floyd, Hawkwind, Ralph McTell, Davy Graham, lightshows, poets, and drug-taking in a crypt

(Episode Three) Notting Hill and the Arts 1967-1972: an interview with Dave Russell – Jazz, Psychedelic Rock Bands, Poetry, Frestonia, Release and Pete Brown’s Battered Ornaments


(Episode Three) Notting Hill and the Arts 1967-1972: an interview with Dave Russell – Jazz, Psychedelic Rock Bands, Poetry, Frestonia, Release and Pete Brown’s Battered Ornaments


Carlyle ReedyCarlyle Reedy

(Episode Three) Notting Hill and the Arts 1967-1972: an interview with Dave Russell – Jazz, Psychedelic Rock Bands, Poetry, Frestonia, Release and Pete Brown’s Battered Ornaments.

Hello Good People who read and contribute to this blog!

Thanks for waiting, there have been technical problems galore which after complaining to TalkTalk and reformatting the computer are gradually clearing up.

I have finally uploaded the third installment of the Dave Russell interview about The Crypt in Notting Hill . He also tells us a bit about Frestonia and Release.

Episode Three of the Dave Russell interview about The Arts and Community Centre Notting Hill

At the start of this post I have put a photo of Carlyle Reedy who started up and ran the club from 1967 to 1972. She is fairly reclusive at present but I hope to meet her soon.

Dave talks about them charging half a crown which is 2/6 ( two and six) in predecimal money which is 12 and a half pence in today’s money . Here is a poster kindly sent to me by Iain Jacobs for the club which has the price and several other interesting points. If you point your cursor over the picture you can enlarge it and read the details. You will see several well known names in music.

Pete Brown’s Battered Ornaments Poster

Pete Brown who is best known for co-writing most of the hits for the band Cream was a performance poet.

Here is a bit I nicked from Wikkipedia:Pete Brown (born December 25, 1940 in Ashtead, Surrey, England) is a British performance poet, lyricist and musical producer, best known for his collaborations with Jack Bruce. He worked also with The Battered Ornaments, and formed his own group Piblokto!. He was part of the poetry scene in Liverpool during the 1960s and in 1964 was the first poet to perform at Morden Tower in Newcastle. In 2004 he formed Brown Waters, an award-winning British film production company[1], with Mark AJ Waters and Miran Hawke….

Brown was originally brought into the Cream fold as a writing partner for drummer Ginger Baker, but the group quickly discovered that he worked better with bassist Jack Bruce. Of the situation, Bruce later remarked “Ginger and Pete were at my flat trying to work on a song but it wasn’t happening. My wife Janet then got with Ginger and they wrote ‘Sweet Wine’ while I started working with Pete.”

Together, Brown and Bruce wrote the majority of Cream’s numbers, including the hits “I Feel Free“, “White Room” and (with Clapton) “Sunshine of Your Love“.

After the breakup of Cream, Bruce and Brown continued to write songs together for Bruce’s solo career. Brown wrote the lyrics for Bruce’s albums Songs For a Tailor, Harmony Row and Into the Storm.”

Chris Spedding is another well-known name who has worked with many people in the music business. Here is a bit taken from his website. It’s a very brief description of his career.

Guitarist/Singer/Songwriter Chris Spedding has been a mainstay of the British session scene since the late 60s, playing with just about everyone from Nucleus, Jack Bruce, John Cale, Elton John, Mike Batt, to Paul McCartney & The Bay City Rollers (anonymously!).
In 1975 Spedding had a hit record called “Motorbikin'”. In the late 70s he moved to the States and worked with Robert Gordon, Jerry Harrison, Dick Rivers and Johnny Hallyday.
Recently, Spedding played with Roxy Music/Bryan Ferry, in the summer of 2005 he released a solo album “CLICK CLACK”. And plays The War Of The World tour!”

Chris’ website is http://www.chrisspedding.com/

It’s funny that I had The Wombles on my Christmas blog because I think Chris may have known them well.

I used to think The Wombles were a very lame excuse for people in the music business to make lots of money out of little children. I still think that but now seeing them on youtube makes me smile and they are almost cool…in fact I’d like be one on stage and do the dances etc…ok I’m being really uncool and must carry on.

getting back to the poster..in brief (as it’s late now and I need to lie down) …Jamie Muir was a free form percussionist and later played in King Crimson and is now a painter.

Charlie Hart has also done 10 billion zillion things here is a short extract from the biography on his website featuring a picture of Pete Brown’s Battered Ornaments:

” As a student Charlie played organ in the psychedelic band 117. The group appeared frequently at the Middle Earth/UFO clubs and recorded at a legendary session with Mick Jagger and Andrew Oldham at Olympic Studios. By that point, Charlie was heavily into black music and the most sensible plan seemed to go to Africa, so he spent a year in Ghana. Highlife and traditional music became an obsession and the next year Charlie returned to sit in with highlife bands and study marimba.

After college he was asked to join Pete Brown’s Battered Ornaments with Chris Spedding, Dick Hextall-Smith and George Khan and he was introduced to the delights of the M1 and the Blue Boar. At that time he also started playing double bass with the People BandTerry Day, Mel Davis, Lyn Dobson, Mike Figgis, Davey Payne and they toured with the People Show. With Davey Payne and Terry Day he formed OMMU and they toured Holland frequently.

OMMU then joined Ian Dury, the eccentric art-school lyricist and Kilburn and the Highroads were at the front of the early 70s Pub-rock boom, free jazz meets rock and roll. Wreckless Eric was in the same stable, and Charlie played keyboards on his first LP. “

His website is http://www.charliehart.com

George Khan was a tenor saxophonist and all of them I’m sure were great ..I just don’t know them and I have to go to bed now! This took longer than I thought.

Next time maybe a bit of ranting, maybe a bit of Frestonia maybe a bit about Steve Hillage maybe some more posters from the 60s and 70s and 80s that are not published anywhere else or nicked ! I will see ..for now

Thanks for reading and bedtime!

but music before bed

see also

Frestonia-Your essential entertainment & lifestyle guide

Coming Soon..more of the Crypt in Notting Hill


Hello Good people who read this blog.

Happy New Year

I am still wrestling with my internet connection but I hope to bring you the next part of the Dave Russell interview and more stories of The Arts and Community Centre Notting Hill otherwise known as “The Crypt” of the Methodist Church in Lancaster Road and other tales of Notting Hill in the late sixties early seventies very soon.

I also have been put in touch with Iain Jacobs who also helped to run the Crypt and was in the “ People Band“(see poster below) which from hearing their album sound similar to bits of jazz from Gong who played in the same venues. As Dave put it ” There was a lot of intermingling!”.

I have received flyers today both from Iain Jacobs and from Michael Dog for my blog . Thank you!

They will appear keep coming back!

Here’s a taster a poster for The People Band at the Crypt in Notting Hill ( not to be confused with the one nearly 20 years later in Deptford!) It’s so nice that people are getting in touch and volunteering their stories. I am still trying to understand various types of computer/internet technology however if you put your cursor over this poster a tool should appear to let you enlarge it and see it in detail. Just click on the poster when it appears in a separate box and then when it goes to a full screen window click again to enlarge further. Some of my other pictures and posters also have this facility.

crypt_poster_07.jpg

Poster courtesy of Iain Jacobs.

Hope to be able to bring you all this soon…

In the Meantime…

Some “Pot Head Pixies ” Genius from Gong!

If you enjoyed that go see my updated post called

“Gong Live Now and Then”

See you soon

Love and Peace

Born2rant

(Episode two) Notting Hill and the Arts 1967-1972: an interview with Dave Russell -Psychedelic rock bands, Pink Floyd, Hawkwind, Ralph McTell, Davy Graham, lightshows, poets, and drug-taking in a crypt


Interview with Dave Russell on the Arts and Community Centre Notting Hill in the 60s and 70s( Part Two)

Following on from my previous post here is episode 2 of my interview with Dave Russell from a couple of weeks ago. Here he continues to tell us of the gigs and wild arts happenings in Notting Hill 1967-1972 occurring first at The Ecumenical Centre in Denbigh Road Notting Hill which later moved to the bigger venue in the crypt of the Methodist Church in Lancaster Road otherwise known as “The Arts and Community Centre Notting Hill” where psychedelic bands such as Gong, Pink Floyd, Hawkwind performed, here he also tells us of acoustic musicians, poets and drug use on church premises.

Dave Russell interview episode 2

I’ll edit and upload the next episode of this interview in a couple of days time.

This is Ron Geesin with “Spiky Diving Bells”

Now I’m cheating by using a documentary of Hawkwind in the early Notting Hill years
(for those of you from outside the UK :Ladbroke Grove is a road and an area in the North End of Notting Hill where it was a bit rougher than than the south, Notting Hill is in the London borough of Kensington and Chelsea but was a much poorer area)

I apologise for name-dropping but I just cannot post that Hawkwind clip without saying that I used to know both Mick Slattery and Terry Ollis who both feature in that clip and have casually played music with both of them..although I’m not sure what they think of me! I’ve also met Lemmy and Nik Turner but they won’t remember me and I don’t remember a lot about them!

This is the Amazing Davy Graham who is still gigging and very influential to British Folk musicians in the 60s

…..and here is Dave Russell himself performing

Back in a couple of days with episode three
Love and Peace
Born2rant

Apologies to anyone who doesn’t have broadband!

I’ll write some more stories soon but unfortunately some of the craziest ones I could write I won’t because I respect my old friends too much not just the ones in this post!