Open Mic Songwriting Communities


Hello Good People who read this blog….

Here’s me sounding terribly posh with an Ethnomusicology documentary on how acoustic/folk clubs support and help develop new songs and performance. Sometimes, like other academic research, I might be stating the bloody obvious, or putting long words to simple ideas, but I hope you enjoy it anyway.

Part one

Part two

Part three

Now I have to concentrate on my own music for a bit along with studies and personal life.

So wishing you Love and Peace

Born2rant

Track Listings:

Please note: I recorded over forty different songwriters over two days. Most of them did not introduce their songs on stage and I neglected to ask each one for their song titles , if indeed they had named their songs yet. I have therefore omitted many of the song titles.

All tracks are recorded by myself on a hand-held Olympus Digital Voice recorder (DS-40)

except for track 14) recorded in 1995 by Simon Scardinelli.

Most of the tracks were recorded at The Green Note, 106 Parkway, in Camden ,on Sunday 29th of March 2009 between 1 and 5 pm. The clips from the Virtually Acoustic Open Mic, were recorded at The Perseverance, 11 Shrotton Street, in Marylebone on Monday 30th of March 2009 between 7.30 pm and 11 pm.

1)Benjamin Thomas recorded at the Green Note Open Mic on 29/3/2009 -59 sec..

2)Interview : Dave Russell recorded 18/3/2009 in my home-56 sec..

3)John Peacock playing his song “Iodine”

Recorded at The Perseverance 30/3/2009 at the Virtually Acoustic Open Mic – 1 min. 2 sec..

4)Siobhan Watts introducing Open Mic rules.

Recorded at The Green Note Open Mic 29/3/2009.- 18 sec..

5)David Sherwood introducing his Open Mic

Recorded at The Perseverance 30/3/2009-23 sec..

6) Tom Poslett playing at the Virtually Acoustic Club recorded 30/3/2009-57 sec..

7)Interview: Alan Levy at the Green Note 29/3/2009- 52 seconds..

8)Alan Levy’s song about fridge and dancing on the table. Recorded at The Green Note Open Mic 29/3/2009-32 sec..

9)Interview :“George The Troubadour”

Recorded at The Perseverance 30/3/2009- 1 min. 9 sec..

10) Oka Vanga playing at The Green Note 29/3/2009-47 sec..

11)Alan’s Easter Song recorded at The Virtually Acoustic Club 30/3/2009-25 sec..

12) Clip of general social noise at The Green Note 29/3/2009- 14 sec..

13) Daniel O’Byrne at the Virtually Acoustic Club 30/3/2009- 52 sec..

14) John Gash playing “It’s Easy to be Terrified”recorded at Bunjies in 8/4/1995-

1 minute 9 seconds.

Recorded by Simon Scardinelli at Bunjies Coffee House and Folk Cellar 27 Litchfield street, London WC2 .

15) Tom Nancollas playing “Lady Jane” written by his friend Jan Yates.

Recorded at the Green Note 29/3/09-1 min. 3 sec..

16) Interview :Alan Levy on stage nerves.

Recorded at the Green Note 29/3/2009-21 seconds

17) Interview: Siobhan Watts on quiet and stage nerves.

Recorded at The Green Note 29/3/2009-23 sec..

18) Interview: David Sherwood talking about not playing his songs at his clubs.

Recorded at The Perseverance 30/3/2009-59 sec..

19) Gerry Scales stage talk and song at The Green Note 29/3/2009-56 sec..

20) Clip of Siobhan’s Stage talk: “Ham’s Travel” recorded at The Green Note 29/3/2009-

28 sec..

21) Mike Rosenberg playing “Carved in Stone” recorded at The Perseverance 30/3/2009- 1 min.

Bibliography

Bealle, John ( 1993) “Self-Involvement in Musical Performance: Stage Talk and Interpretive Control at a Bluegrass Festival” Ethnomusicology 37.1:63-86.

Cadle, Peter (1994) Nights in the cellar: A History by Peter Cadle with contributions from performers and audiences over the past 40 years. London:Bunjies pp.6-15

Hesselink, Nathan (1994), “Kouta and karaoke in modern Japan: a blurring of the distinction between Umgangsmusik and Darbietungmusik”,British Journal of Ethnomusicology 3:49-61.

Jang, Yeonok (2001) “P’ansori performance style: audience responses and singers’ perspectives.” British Journal of Ethnomusicology. 10.2:99-121

Kisliuk, Michelle (1988) “’A Special Kind of Courtesy’:Action at a Bluegrass Festival Jam Session”.TDR 32.3:141-155

Seeger, Charles (1977) Studies in Musicology 1935-1975. Berkeley and Los Angeles:University of California Press.

Stockman, Doris (1978) “Zum Problem einer Klassification der kommunikativen Prozesse.” in Philosophische und ethische Probleme der modernen Verhaltensforschung, edited by G.Tembrock et. al., Berlin:Akademie-Verlag. quoted in Hesselink, Nathan (1994), “Kouta and karaoke in modern Japan: a blurring of the distinction between Umgangsmusik and Darbietungmusik”,British Journal of Ethnomusicology 3:49.

– ( 1991) “Interdisciplinary Approaches to Musical Communication Structures.” in Nettl and Bohlman (eds) Comparative Musicology and Anthropology of Music,318-341. Chicago and London:University of Chicago Press.

Film References

Message to Love : The Isle of Wight Festival (1997) BBC documentary Directed and written by Murray Lerner.127 minutes.

Woman of Heart and Mind (2003) Directed by Susan Lacy. PBS Documentary.120 minutes.

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You Can’t Kill The Spirit (but we have!)


Hello Good People who read this blog…

I was just online ambling through youtube and ended up writing this   …Calling  out to all the sons and daughters of this world, on Hippie Mother Earth Day ( getting  carried away with my ranting as usual)

Gong’s “Flying Teapot” with film edits from Timothy Leary’s
How to Operate Your Brain” courtesy of LSDCoatedBrain

I don’t have an LSD coated Brain but can still appreciate a great artistic combination and relate to the old hippie ideals and strong communities.
I feel very strongly that you don’t need to take drugs to be a hippie because to me being a hippie is a philosophy and a positive way of life that doesn’t rely on extremes of religion or drug-taking.
Of course I have taken some hallucinogens but I liked Gong and Hendrix and other “drug” associated music and wanted to look at the world of new social possibilities before I’d ever tried any type of drug.

One of the many ways the hippie movement is put down and ridiculed is by categorizing them as just a load of addicts.

To me the drugs are peripheral and not necessary to access the world of creative imagination and feeling connected to a positive non-materialistic ideology and actively implementing this in  many directions.

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Once upon a time we were building new worlds, and travelling to new worlds, experimenting with new ways of living and now laws and apathy discourage today’s youth from ever trying anything without wearing a crash helmet, taking a degree in it and getting official permission  first…
One hippie proverb used to be “You Can’t Kill The Spirit”. Anyone remember where that came from?

Through TV and advertising, violent computer games and extreme internet porn, You CAN Kill the Spirit
By making women feel they are getting old and are therefore unlovable and worthless in their twenties and need the latest miracle potion, surgery, clothes, make-up,You CAN kill the Spirit.
A million money making enterprises disempower you and then sell you things to make you feel partly in control again, appealing to the most basic of urges.
In London we are shattered into hundreds of  fragmented communities who never manage to spontaneously link up or work together.
Instead people walk into eachother and glare at eachother in the street and we allow the powers that be to supervise us on camera as we feel too weak to deal with things in person.


Our sense of community and identity is broken in our society and sectarianism is on the increase.

I preferred the world of jamming experimenting collaborative individuals. i.e. Hippies.

Spontaneous, unfunded, grassroots events like the free gigs in Meanwhile Gardens in Notting Hill kept our spirits up. Now even folk clubs can’t function without being given permission by the council and being regularly inspected.

Our Universities are no longer places where you can express opinions instead we are encouraged NOT to think for ourselves but to be content to quote the “Great and the Good” . Only “official” and “certified” thinkers are allowed.

UK Universities are not places of learning but places of earning. They are not places of free and evolutionary thought but places for worshipping the academic élite.

They are not places where new political ideologies are being created but student politics are increasingly reflecting, and are over-powered by,  religious sectarianism and global tensions between nations.

In my experience there is no free speech in a higher educational institution, on any level , without getting into trouble. If you want to express an opinion it had better be one that has been sanctioned by those in charge, be it academic, or student’s union ( anyone from my Uni who claims otherwise is basically trying to save face).

£££££££££££££££$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$%%%%%%%%%%%%

“You Can’t Kill The Spirit “, I remember now… I was involved in running one of the stages at The Fordham Park Free Festival in the nineties “You Can’t Kill The Spirit” was the slogan… I still have the T-Shirt…( and am writing the book, well the blog).

“You Can’t Kill the Spirit” was also a slogan and a song from the Women of Greenham Common. I never went to Greenham Common but joined another anti-Nuclear organisation and protested. Nothing is perfect and I didn’t agree with some of the over-the-top man-hating philosophies that a minority of the Greenham women had. But they were terribly brave , they risked their lives for their cause and they had spirit.

They also were non-violent and were prepared to live in terrible conditions for Peace and a better world.

for a whole load more go to this website:

http://www.yourgreenham.co.uk/

greenham1



borrowed from a site with loads of photos of Greenham Commonhttp://www.fredsakademiet.dk/abase/sange/greenham/sigrid.htm

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Getting back to opposing factions..I believe that sectarianism is wrong ( I am being all moral…well I am Born2rant after all) . I can only see sectarianism leading to more and more misunderstanding and violence.

I don’t believe in “Us and Them” underneath I think we are all the same but here I get stuck because sometimes you have to fight for your basic rights so this inevitably leads to a split .

I don’t believe in factions who all blame and hate one another so I am not keen on groups. But I get stuck again because we all need to feel a sense of identity and a sense of belonging , where birds of a feather flock together etc… I think we need to belong to a community, to feel alive and worthwhile and to know that other people like the same things , share the same ideas etc… But the problem is when people become a bit too clingy to their own group and isolated from the rest, some can become paranoid and polarised, then some kind of craziness is bound to  ensue (see Daily Mail for details…).

But anyhoo…
It’s hard to find anyone under forty in London who is not totally apathetic about  fighting the system to make this world a free place where individuals can do something positive and feel they have some basic control over their lives.

Here is a bit of footage from the Fordham Park Free Festival in London Deptford in 1991. They also had the slogan “You can’t Kill The Spirit”

By the 90s well we were already quite tame, the local council threatened to sue us for vast amounts of money  if the music continued a minute past 10pm , I seem to remember.

I was in charge of my stage at 10pm,  a bit of a nightmare as the band just wouldn’t stop doing encores. I tried to pull the plug so we didn’t get fined but the band  had cleverly rigged up their own secret secondary generator and even when we pulled the plug on that they carried on with their frenetic set acoustically  and the crowd danced wildly. I was getting people screaming at me but there was nothing I could do. The power of  youthful and collective anarchy ( plus musician’s egos and drunken dancing audience)  is  too great for one hippie to stop.
If I could go back in time I wouldn’t have pulled the plug on them at all. Now you can’t have live music without a licence, the world has gone mad.
If you are a rebel, join with others and do not be put off by the authorities!

Love and Peace from a grumpy old hippie Mum, dismayed yet understanding of the apathy of youth…


Born2rant
Here’s “Electric Gypsies” with Steve Hillage
starts with what sounds to me like some Tibetan Horns.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sectarian

The Dave Russell Interviews reborn ( Notting Hill Arts- 1967-72)


Hello Good People who read this blog

If you go back in time to my earlier entries you will find some interesting stories about Notting Hill in the 60s and 70s and also Anti-Media activities in the 80s , bits about the gigs before Club Dog etc….

However I have been having problems with technology and the Dave Russell interviews being repeatedly deleted .

Therefore I have re-issued part one of this interview on Youtube. It’s the first time I have ever done anything like this so don’t expect miracles!

Enjoy ! and to read onthe background to the things mentioned in this interview go back to my previous post called

Notting Hill and the Arts 1967-1972: an interview with Dave Russell – Pink Floyd, Hawkwind, Gong and more…(Episode One)

This was written back in the winter of 2007 and the weather today is about the same.

here is part two of the interview for more information go to my previous post

(Episode two) Notting Hill and the Arts 1967-1972: an interview with Dave Russell -Psychedelic rock bands, Pink Floyd, Hawkwind, Ralph McTell, Davy Graham, lightshows, poets, and drug-taking in a crypt

Part two

Part Three

of the interview below please see this post for more details:

(Episode Three) Notting Hill and the Arts 1967-1972: an interview with Dave Russell – Jazz, Psychedelic Rock Bands, Poetry, Frestonia, Release and Pete Brown’s Battered Ornaments

The final part

read more on

(Episode Four) Dave Russell – Notting Hill 1967-1972 The Free School, Destruction in Art Symposium, Friends/Frendz magazine and the Rural Retreat

Love and peace

Born2rant